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OPEN WIDE AND SAY "MEOW"

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OPEN WIDE AND SAY "MEOW"

You wouldn’t allow your child to neglect his or teeth, would you? Dental care is as important for cats as it is to your family and you. Poor feline oral hygiene and bad teeth can cause immediate discomfort as well infection in the body, and it’s also linked to heart and kidney disease.
 
Most dental problems are linked to poor genetics. It is not unusual for many cats to have great teeth with minimal gingivitis without any effort to maintain. But other cats develop severe gingivitis, an inflammation in the gums causes by the bacteria in the mouth. Inflammation can be moderate to severe, and other disease processes may influence the level of gingivitis.  

Conditions such as stomatitis, an autoimmune disease manifested by inflamed gums to the point of bleeding (with severe discomfort), can only be treated with a full mouth extraction. Bartonella, also known as “Cat Scratch Fever” in people -- a bacteria commonly spread by fleas or exposure to other cats with the infection -- typically causes the gums to be inflamed.  

We are among the most frequent Bartonella screeners in New England. Diagnosed with a simple blood test, we have successfully treated many cases of this infection with antibiotics.

Then there are dental issues not associated from other diseases. Many vets recommend dental cleanings that involve anesthetizing the cat and using an ultrasonic cleaner to clean under the gum line. While this can be useful, it doesn’t manage chronic gingivitis (due to expense and limitations of some cats to be safely anesthetized). The process also puts your cat through of stress and potentially unnecessary use of anesthesia. NECC doesn’t want to put your cat under anesthesia unless is it’s absolutely necessary.  

Calculus is a hard substance that tends to form on the back teeth and, left untreated, can lead to gum infections and tooth decay. We’ve designed an effective and simple way to manage your cat’s dental issues, using an instrument to break calculus (known as tartar in human beings) off your cat’s teeth. We also treat gingivitis flare ups with antibiotic treatments that stop inflammation by targeting bacteria causes inflammation. Most cats tend to only require a couple antibiotics treatments a year to control gingivitis.

Remember, a healthy cat is the center of a happy family!

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